Bosão de Higgs e quark top
6 de Junho de 2018.
Universidades portuguesas em queda
8 de Junho de 2018.
The pillory: the macabre symbol of justice in old Europe and Portugal.

On my tours, through the city of Funchal, I often pass the pillory of Funchal and explain its history because it is an important monument to understand the past of the city.

The pillory was a device used all over Europe and has its roots in the medieval times. It was either made of a wooden or metal framework erected on a post, with holes for securing the head and hands or, like the pillory of Funchal a stone column formerly used for punishment by public humiliation and often further physical abuse.

In Portugal, a pillory is called a Pelourinho and often classified as national monuments since they can date back as far as the late Roman period. The pillory of Funchal is obviously not as old as the pillories in the mainland its first documented reference emerges in a letter dated October 3rd, 1486 from Manuel I, the Duke of Viseu and master of the Order of Christ.

But the flood in 1803 washed away this first pillory and so Funchal got a new pillory out of volcanic stone until it was removed in 1835 by a council decision taken on the 3rd of November «this being a symbol of feudal times and not being in harmony with current customs, having the stones removed duly stored». Anyway two parts of this pillory sustained and where integrated in the pillory which was reinstalled in 2016 and can be found on the Largo do Pelourinho (Pillory square), the original position of the pillories of Funchal, in these days.

A small sign tells in Portuguese and English about the gruesome history of these mostly ignored stones.

Short bio of the volunteer:

Julius Sax, a volunteer from Germany with interest in basketball, tennis, scouts, playing guitar, read and meet friends.

Erasmus+

Erasmus+ is a programme of the European Commission embracing the fields of education, training, youth and sports during the period 2014-2020. One of the major aspects is the cooperation between the different fields where the programme acts, hence contributing for a diverse and rich Europe.

Amongst the several goals of the programme, the following are prioritised: the objectives of the Europe 2020 Strategy, including the headline education target; the aims of the strategic framework for European cooperation in education and training (ET 2020), including the corresponding benchmarks; the sustainable development of Partner Countries in the field of higher education; the overall goals of the renewed framework for European cooperation in the youth field (2010-2018); the objective of developing the European dimension in sport, in particular grassroots sport, in line with the EU work plan for sport and the promotion of European values in accordance with Article 2 of the Treaty on the European Union.

In order to achieve these goals, the Erasmus+ has several action policies. The Key Action 1 (KA1) is directed towards the mobility of people; Key Action 2 (KA2) for the cooperation for innovation and the interchange of good experiences; and Key Action 3, which is for the support of reformation policies.

European Voluntary Service

Since 1991 the University of Madeira Students’ Union has developed a wide incentive policy for voluntary work. In 2013 the Students’ Union started the process to receive, send and coordinate Erasmus+ projects of the European Voluntary Service, in order to have a larger influence in the volunteering field. The Union received its first volunteer withing the ambit of a KA1 project in 2014. Many efforts have been done to allow young people from Madeira to take part in several initiatives in Europe, as well as propose several projects allowing young people from several countries to work in the projects of the Students’ Union of the University of Madeira. The main goal of the voluntary work is the contribution of the volunteers to the communities and places they will be staying, being their work not rewarded with payment.

We believe that the European Voluntary Service is a mechanism full of experiences, allowing the approved candidates to have the privilege of taking part in these projects and benefit the places and communities where these volunteers will be staying.

Since 2013, the University of Madeira Students’ Union has received volunteers that have collaborated in several activities and initiatives. Besides being able to enjoy a wonderful experience which will contribute to their personal and professional growth, they are able to contribute in a unique way to the community in which they are inserted and to join dozens of volunteers from the University of Madeira.